This lovely polymer is called:




Collagen



By: Ally Morris and Rachel Gonsalves

Technical Name: Collagen
Common Name: Collagen


Method of Linking Monomers: Condensation
Explanation: Made up of amino acids,such as Glycine, Hydroxyproline, and Proline. Glycine is a main component of the structure, it is found every three amino acids. The three peptide chains are what make up the triple helix structure.




Collagen Structure: Notice the Glycine- A Key Component to Collagen
Collagen Structure: Notice the Glycine- A Key Component to Collagen




Collagen is a natural substance found in all the connective tissues in our bodies: bones, skin, etc; it is crucial in providing the structure for all of our internal organs. Collagen is actually one of the most abundantly found naturally occuring proteins on Earth. If an injury occurs to the tissues in body, collagen is neccesary to restore structure and aid in recovery.




Why do we wrinkle?

external image collagen.gif

Collagen makes up 90% of your dermal volume! Woahhh! That's more than 3/4 of your skin! This helps to give your skin strength. Let me hear you roar! Due to constant interaction with the sun, the collagen fibers weaken and the result is sad, weakened skin, that becomes dry and wrinkled. So now you know why your mother always wanted you to wear your sun screen!


Mr. Light Head says, "Wrinkles are no fun, but they are for everyone!!"
Mr. Light Head says, "Wrinkles are no fun, but they are for everyone!!"




In the body: Collagen fibers help with the outside structure of cells and are also found inside certain cells as well.

  • As people get older their collagen production decreases; this is what causes wrinkles.
Some of the physical characteristics of collagen is that it is a triple helix. As mentioned and shown in the picture above, collagen has the amino acid glycine and it also contains hydroproxyline. Collagen is a scleroprotein; a protein that has low water solubility.

Molecular weight: 285,000 (3 X 95,000)

Some of the chemical characteristics/properties of collagen is that when boiled, the triple helix is destroyed and the resulting product is gelatin. In this process, the cross linkage is destroyed adn the volume of the resulting substance signficantly (1/3) smaller.




collagen_(alpha_chain).jpg
This picture shows collagen's triple helix and it's structural formula- When Boiled This is Destroyed In a Crazy Explosion of Love and Passion Between the Burning Water and Collagen's Structure



Is there cross linkage occurring? Yes
Multi-cellular animals rely on Collagen to provide support in the cells, and this can only occur from strong cross linkage that collagen has. Their cross linking results from covalent bonds from aldehydes produced from lysyl and hydroxylysls side chains by lysyl oxidase.

Collagen is very important as it is not only used in our bodies but it also has some major medical purposes. In cosmetics, collagen helps with joint mobility and helps to make skin for burn victims.


Collagen Injections- People use collagen to plumpify their bodily assests when they lack confidence.
Collagen Injections- People use collagen to plumpify their bodily assests when they lack confidence.



With the positive aspects that collagen brings, it also has it's negative aspects. As you age, collagen decreases in the body causing wrinkles and joint weakening. A disease that's resulted from this is Brittle Bone Disease caused by collagen defeciencies.

For more information, contact Ally Morris at ally_morris@caryacademy.org or Rachel Gonsalves at rachel_gonsalves@caryacademy.org


MLA Citations:

Diegelmann, Robert F. "Collagen Metabolism." Medscape Today. 2001. Health Managment Publications, Inc. 13 May 2008.
<http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/423231
>
Madison, N. "What is Collagen?" Wise Geek. 2003. Conjecture Corporation. 13 May 2008. <
[[http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-collagen.htm%3C/span%3E%3Cspan|http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-collagen.htm<span]] style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff">>
Collagen Structure. 15 May 2008. <
[[http://www.physics.montana.edu/ICAL/images/Gallery%20Pics/pages/Collagen%20Structure.htm%3C/span%3E%3Cspan|http://www.physics.montana.edu/ICAL/images/Gallery%20Pics/pages/Collagen%20Structure.htm<span]] style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000">>
"Collagen." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2008. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 16 May 2008
<http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9024756>.</span>
Picture:
**www.purecol-uk.com/ page2.htm**
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